Felonies and Misdemeanors

Like many states, Texas law sets time limits for a host of specific crimes. For crimes not specifically listed in the statute, a general statute of limitations applies: (Tex. Crim. Proc. Code §§ 12.01, 12.02 (2019).)

Statute of Limitations: Specific Crimes

Below are examples of time limits for specific felony crimes in Texas. Keep in mind that the following is a partial list that broadly summarizes the law. You should look at the actual law for nuances, exceptions, and legislative changes—and know that court rulings can affect the interpretation of the law.
(Tex. Crim. Proc. Code §§ 12.01, 12.02, 12.05 (2019).)
Murder, Manslaughter, and Homicide

  • Murder: no time limit
  • Manslaughter: no time limit
  • Hit and run involving death: no time limit
  • Criminally negligent homicide: 5 years after the crime

Sexual Assault (Rape) Offenses

  • Sexual assault of a child; aggravated sexual assault of a child (younger than 17): no time limit
  • Continuous sexual abuse of young child or children (younger than 14): no time limit
  • Sexual assault offenses where probable cause exists to believe the defendant has committed similar sex offenses against five or more victims: no time limit
  • Other felony sexual assault offenses: 10 years after the crime (see exception below for DNA evidence)


Criminal Defense- Statute of Limitations:

Trafficking and Prostitution Offenses

  • Sex trafficking of a child (younger than 18): no time limit
  • Continuous trafficking of persons: no time limit
  • Compelling prostitution of a child (younger than 18): no time limit
  • Compelling prostitution (adult): 10 years after the crime
  • Trafficking of persons (adults): 10 years after the crime

Felony Theft and Fraud Offenses

  • Theft by a fiduciary: 10 years after the crime
  • Theft of government property by a public servant: 10 years after the crime
  • Forgery: 10 years after the crime
  • Misapplication of fiduciary property: 7 years after the crime
  • Financial exploitation of a child (14 and younger), elderly individual (65 and older), or disabled individual: 7 years after the crime
  • Felony tax code violation: 7 years after the crime
  • Credit or debit card abuse: 7 years after the crime
  • Fraudulent use or possession of identifying information: 7 years after the crime
  • Health care fraud: 7 years after the crime
  • Insurance fraud: 5 years after the crime
  • Other felony theft or robbery: 5 years after the crime

(Tex. Crim. Proc. Code § 12.01 (2019).)
DNA Evidence
For felony sexual assault cases where DNA evidence is collected, no time limitations apply if:

  • DNA has not been tested, or
  • DNA has been tested but does not match victim or any other identifiable person.

(Tex. Crim. Proc. Code § 12.01 (1) (2019)).
Tolling: Starting and Stopping the Clock
Generally, the statute of limitations starts when the crime occurs. But in circumstances where it’s difficult to discover the crime or a victim might be particularly scared to report it, the law might delay the starting of the time clock.
For instance, Texas law doesn’t start the clock for certain crimes committed against a child until the victim reaches adulthood, including:

  • aggravated kidnapping with intent to sexually assault: time limit is 20 years from victim’s 18th birthday
  • trafficking for forced labor or services: time limit is 10 years from victim’s 18th birthday, and
  • injury to a child: time limit is 10 years from victim’s 18th birthday.

Also, if a person tries to “evade” (avoid) arrest for a crime, the law gives the prosecutor extra time to file charges. In Texas, the statute of limitations is tolled while the defendant is absent from the state.
(Tex. Crim. Proc. Code § 12.05 (2019).)

Law Office of Robert C. E. Wolfe, P.C.

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